Ryan Locke on podcast about the steps you should take after a car accident

Ryan was a guest on Neil Howe and Craig Williams' podcast, Business Authority Radio, to discuss the steps to take when you get into an auto accident or any accident where you were not at fault. Find out the schemes the insurance companies try to pull and how you can avoid them.

Ryan also covers some of the most common questions people ask during consultations. He also covers some of the common mistakes that can end up costing you big time. Ryan clears up some of the misconceptions about personal injury attorneys and encourages people to get in contact with a professional as quickly as possible even if you think your case isn’t worth it.

You can listen to the show or read this transcript:

Introduction:

Welcome to Business Authority Radio, bringing you insights from today's thought leaders, professionals, and influencers. With your hosts, Neil Howe and Craig Williams.

 

Neil Howe:

Hello, and welcome to show. This is your host Neil Howe, and today my guest is Ryan Locke. Ryan is a trial lawyer in Atlanta, Georgia. He represents people who need justice. That's injured people who need help getting made whole, or people appealing their criminal convictions, and people whose civil rights have been violated. Ryan is also an adjunct professor at the Emory University of School of Law, where he teaches trial techniques to law students.

Welcome to the show, Ryan.

 

Ryan Locke:

Well thank you for having me, Neil.

 

Neil Howe:

No problem. Let's get right to it. Tell us a little bit about the Locke law firm, and how you're helping your clients?

 

Ryan Locke:

Sure. Well, I started my firm about five years ago, after working as a public defender here in Atlanta. And, at the beginning, I really focused on what I knew how to do, which is representing people who had been charged with crimes. And I kind of slowly expanded over the years. Mostly because people would come to me and need help, and I kind of have a hard time saying no. And so, now I represent people who've been injured, and they need to kind of get back to where they were, recover from their harms and losses. I still represent people who have been charged with crimes, but now I mostly do it on appeal, after they've been convicted.

 

Neil Howe:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

 

Ryan Locke:

And then people who their civil rights have been violated, typically by the government, and are kind of in unique situations where they need someone to step in and kind of help them, and sue the government if necessary.

 

Neil Howe:

Right.

 

Ryan Locke:

So that's what I'm doing now.

 

Neil Howe:

Excellent. Well, describe some of the problems that people have when they come to you. Let's take one subject here that you cover, maybe personal injury, what kind of issues do people have and why they are needing your help?

 

Ryan Locke:

Yeah, that is a common thing, most of my clients come to me because they've been injured in one way or another. And a lot of them because they've been injured in the car. Someone ran into them and it was the other person's fault, and they're injured, and now they're worried about how they're going to fix their car, how they're going to get treatment for their injuries, how they're going to get paid back for the work time that they lose.

 

 

So that's the typical problem that I help people who come and talk to me about.

 

Neil Howe:

What kind of outcomes are they looking for? Are they just looking to get their medical expenses covered, or are they really looking for compensation? What's the outcome that these people are actually searching for when they go to you for help?

 

Ryan Locke:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). That's a great question, because one of the ... most clients who come to me are injured in some way, and if they're injured in a very serious way, then they clearly deserve more money than if they're injured in a less serious way. And that makes sense, right? The person who hit you, the person who was negligent, has to pay for all the harms that flow from that negligence.

 

 

Now, I'm in rear ended, and I hurt my neck or my back, I have to go to the ER, they do some scans, and nothing's broken or torn or anything, but I still feel sore. Maybe I have to go to my primary care doctor, or go to physical therapy or something. I still deserve some money for that, right? I shouldn't come out of pocket, because someone else injured me.

 

 

And there's all these intangibles that now I have to deal with. The pain, and just existing in pain. I'm a lawyer, so I spend a lot of time at my desk. If I'm in pain, I can't spend as much time at my desk. And I can't work as well, because I'm distracted by this pain for large periods of the day. So, there is some money for that too.

 

 

But the realistic answer is, people deserve to be compensated for those things, but if you're making a lot of money off of your claim, it's because you have been seriously injured, and you deserve that money, because you have been seriously harmed.

 

Neil Howe:

Yeah, I had a similar case myself not so long ago, where I got rear ended and had a lot of back and neck pain, but ultimately, I thought well, okay, I'll get over it, it's not too bad. Do you see a lot of that kind of thinking? I mean, what should I have done? I guess I really suffered with the pain for about a year afterwards before it kind of subsided. What should people do when they get rear ended like that?

 

Ryan Locke:

That's a real common occurrence, and it's funny the amount of people who call me or come into my office, and say, "I don't even know if I need a lawyer." And many of them are right. If it's the type of claim that you're talking about, where you're what we call soft tissue injuries, is if you have a soft tissue injury, where you've been essentially banged up in the car, but you're otherwise fine, and there's no real long term consequences, and the insurance companies aren't really jerking you around, then that's a claim that people handle on their own every day. And I think they should.

 

 

What kind of popped into my ear when you said that, when you were talking about your experience, is that you were in pain for a year. And that's a long time to be in pain, and that's a long time to suffer ill effects from someone's negligence. And I think the difficult thing for those kinds of cases, is accurately describing to the insurance adjuster how the case has affected you.

 

 

And I'll always remember, I represented this Georgia Tech student, and she broke her arm in a car accident. And so I was sitting down and I was talking to her about the things that I would expect she had trouble with, right. It was her dominant hand, and so she had trouble taking notes in school. She had to take pain killers, and so she wasn't super ... there were times when she felt mentally sluggish, and so she couldn't study. And I immediately thought oh, well those are problems a student would have. And then she told me, "Oh, and by the way, I couldn't go to a lot of these social events because I had these really cute clothes to wear, but I couldn't wear them with this big brace on my arm. I had to wear these big baggy t-shirts all the time and that was really terrible for me."

 

 

And I thought ... I would probably not in ... we could have sat for hours, and I wouldn't have thought of that, because it's so far outside of my own experience. But it's harm was caused to her, and it caused her serious distress, and it's something that we need to describe to the insurance company, because she is owed some type of compensation for being put in that position, right?

 

Neil Howe:

Yeah, so, what are the advantages of going to an attorney like yourself before going to the insurance company, or even just trying to do it yourself?

 

Ryan Locke:

I think ... I limit the cases that I take, because it works better for me and my clients when I have a smaller number of cases that I can kind of put a lot of time in. So, if you come with a case where I know I can't really add value, I will tell you that. And I'll tell you, "Hey, here's what I recommend that you do to deal with your insurance company. If things jump the rails then call me, or text me, or come back in. But you'll probably be fine. The amount of money that I would charge you to handle your case is ... I'm not going to generate more than that in value for you, why hire? It makes no sense."

 

 

Where I do add value, is one, if the insurance company is jerking you around. Particularly if they're trying to argue that you are partially at fault for the accident when you're not. And it's a common insurance company argument to say, "Well, we think that you are 20% at fault for the accident And so, here is what we think you should be paid, and we're going to take 20% off that, and here go, take it or leave it." So they're taking an already kind of low offer, slashing 20% off of it, and then trying to get you to accept it. So in those situations, obviously I can help.

 

 

The second one is if you have a more complicated medical situation. If you have broken bones, if something is torn, right. If it is something beyond being banged up, then I will add value to your case, because I will be able to make sure that you're getting the medical treatment that you need, and that it's adequately documented. And then adequately explaining it to the insurance company, really showing them that this is the damage that their driver caused, and this is what they need to pay.

 

 

And then really the third area is sometimes people just don't want to deal with it. Where people want someone ... when you're hiring a lawyer, you're asking that lawyer to join your team. And to carry this problem with you. When people come to talk to me, it's typically not the happiest day of their life. They've just been injured, or they've just been convicted, or they've been abused by the government. And so they have this problem, and they need help with it, and they don't want to go it alone. And I think that that's a real service that we provide, aside from the legal services. It's that you know that you have someone who is standing next to you, and who is in your corner, possibly for years to come. And I think that provides some comfort.

 

Neil Howe:

Yeah, I think you said it right there, with the last word, it's comfort. It's having that confidence that somebody's standing next to you that actually knows what they're doing and knows how to handle the insurance company, so that they're not getting away with the stuff that they try and get away with just to save a few pennies.

 

 

So let me ask you this, if somebody does get in an accident, what are the first actions they should take to make sure that they are covered?

 

Ryan Locke:

Sure. The first thing they should do is they should call the police, and make sure that the police come and do an accident report. And you'd be surprised at the number of times when you're sitting at a red light and you get rear ended, and it's minor, so you say eh, I don't need to call the police. And then three months later, their insurance adjuster tells you, "Well, they said that you backed into them and so we don't think that they're responsible." So it's always best, even in minor accidents, to have a police officer come out and document everything.

 

 

The second thing is, and the most important thing in all this is, you need to make sure that you are okay. That you're medically okay. So, if you think ... if you're seriously injured, you probably won't have a lot of say in it, an ambulance is going to come, they're going to take you to the hospital, and they're going to treat you. But I think if you're in a seemingly minor car accident, that it's important to be evaluated. Now, you don't have to go straight to the hospital. You could make an appointment with your primary care physician for the next day, or the next couple days, so that they can examine you. But you want to make sure that, one, that you have a medical professional to examine you and make sure that everything's okay, and two, that you have a record of what's going on with you at that time.

 

 

And so the real, I want to say a danger situation for someone, is they are in a minor car accident, and they're banged up, but they feel generally okay. And it's typically normal, by the way, for these types of soft tissue banged up injuries, for you to feel completely fine, and then a couple days later you feel terrible. And that's when you really start feeling it, and that's completely normal. What you want to avoid is, you feel completely terrible, but you don't really deal with it. And then you generally feel better, but then it turns out that, unbeknownst to you, you, let's say, suffered a partial tear in your rotator cuff. Now, that's a serious surgery, right? But you may not realize that that happened to you for months. Everything else may start feeling better, but your shoulder always kind of aches a little it, it's not really getting better, and so finally someone does an MRI and realizes it. Hopefully it's caught way earlier, but I've had cases where that's the case, where people don't realize that they're seriously injured until down the line. And then what is seemingly a simple case turns into something more complicated.

 

Neil Howe:

And what's this, like the statute of limitations, I guess, on that? If you were injured in an accident like three or six months ago, can you still contact an attorney and get some kind of benefit or compensation?

 

Ryan Locke:

Oh yeah. So you have two years from the date of the negligent act in which to file suit. And that's really what you're trading away to the insurance company. They're paying you money in exchange for you not suing their insured. And so, you have ... I want to say a lot of time, in some cases it's not a lot of time, but generally you have a fair amount of time in which to figure out am I hurt? And what do I need to do about it?

 

 

The real risk is one, accepting an early settlement. Insurance company ... you may get banged up, the next week the adjuster calls you and says, "Hey, we'll fix your car and we'll pay your $2,000." And you think oh, great. My car is getting fixed, this was easy, they're giving me 2,000 bucks I didn't have last week, I need the money, this is great. You sign the papers, and then a month later, you're in your doctor's office because your shoulder still hurts, and then they tell you about the torn rotator cuff. Well, you can't go back and undue that settlement. You can't go back and say, "Oh, it turns out I'm really more injured than I thought, so I need more money."

 

 

So that's a big risk in settling early and not seeing a lawyer. The second risk in waiting is, insurance companies may try to use that against you. There are a lot of reasons we may have what they call gaps in treatment. In fact, I had an insurance company once argue to me, this woman was referred to a specialist, it was right around the holidays, and so she went out of town for a week for Christmas. Came back, it took a week to schedule an appointment with the specialist, and then she went in to see the specialist. And an insurance company tried to argue with me, "Well, that's a two week gap in coverage, so we're not going to pay for anything after that." Which obviously is completely ridiculous.

 

Neil Howe:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

 

Ryan Locke:

But in some cases is could be legit. If I'm in a car accident, and then I don't go see a doctor for four months, and then I start going to see a doctor, I think there are, from the insurance company's perspective, legitimate concerns that what you're complaining about now may not be a result of the accident. That's another reason why I think it's important, even if you think I have some pain in my back, my shoulder aches a little bit, but I'm sure I'm fine. Another reason why I think it's good to go into your primary care doctor and at least get a record of what's going on with you, so that if next month it turns into something serious, we can point to that appointment and say, "Before this collision, my client's back and shoulder did not hurt, and then here it did."

 

Neil Howe:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). So, really, the major thing to do is to get some kind of documentation so that you can prove things, even if it is a little bit further down the road?

 

Ryan Locke:

I think so. I think so. And, it's also ... I've asked so many of my clients, "Hey, would you rather have money, or would you rather have never been injured in the first place?" Literally every single one has said, "I wish I was never injured in the first place."

 

Neil Howe:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

 

Ryan Locke:

Right. No one wants to be sick, no one wants to be injured. And you deserve to be compensated for these harms, and losses that you suffer. But the best case is to not suffer harms and losses in the first place. And so I think a big focus, too, is you want to make sure that if you're hurt, you get better. And I'm not doctor, but I'm sure doctors will say the sooner you get treated for your injuries, the better it's going to be.

 

Neil Howe:

Definitely. So what do you think are some of the biggest myths out there when it comes to being compensated, if you get in ... well, we've been talking about car accidents, but any kind of accident, what myths are there surrounding getting compensation, or hiring a lawyer?

 

Ryan Locke:

Well, I think one myth is kind of the scope of what we can control, I think that's the common myth in any industry. Common myth for everyone is the scope of what we can control is much smaller than what we think it is. And so, sometimes people get fired up. Where they come in, and they say, "That other driver is lying about what happened, and I can't believe they're going to do that, and we're ... lawyer can, and you show up in a suit, and everyone's suddenly going to agree with us, and we're going to be okay."

 

 

Unfortunately, that is not a magic power that I possess. And so, I think that one is, we focus on the stuff that we can control. And doing that to the best that we can. I can't guarantee an outcome to anyone, no lawyer can, because it's out of our hands. But, we can guarantee that we will work as hard as we can, that we'll use all of our knowledge and experience, and that we will put forth the best case possible.

 

 

And I think that that really sets expectations. Another myth is that I'm in a minor car accident, I'm going to see Ryan Locke, and I'm going to walk out a millionaire. Which is simply not true. I wish it could be true, but it's not true. I think that we focus on ... we put together the best possible case for you, to show what harms and losses you suffered, and how you should be compensated for those. And then we go out and we fight the good fight.

 

Neil Howe:

Right.

 

Ryan Locke:

And if the harms and losses that you suffered are a couple thousand dollars, you deserve that just as much as someone who has been seriously injured, or in the terrible situation where someone loses their life. The amount doesn't matter in terms of you deserve to be put back in the position you were in before the harm that happened.

 

Neil Howe:

Definitely. And oftentimes, it's just a matter of principle, as well, it's not necessarily the amount. If you've been wronged, you deserve to have it be made right.

 

 

So what are some of the common fears, maybe, about contacting an attorney for an injury case? What goes through a person's head that might make them not make the call, when they really should be?

 

Ryan Locke:

I think lawyers can be intimidating. And, I don't know, I think people have a idea of lawyers kind of sitting in an ivory tower, and you've got to get through the secretary, and the paralegal, and then the other paralegal and then you can finally come see the lawyer. And then the lawyer's going to be kind of mean, and rushed, and not have time for you.

 

 

And so we ... I was deliberate in, when I started my firm, that that was the kind of thing that I hated, is kind of pretentious, self important lawyers who ... I remember, when I was a public defender, I'd be in the halls of the courthouse, and I would see lawyers yelling at their clients in the hall, trying to convince them to do something. And I remember thinking, I never want to be that kind of lawyer. No one wants to be that kind of ... no one wants to have that kind of lawyer. I wouldn't want to hire that kind of lawyer.

 

 

So, one thing that we do to kind of help people is we're super accessible to our clients. I give clients my cellphone, I tell them to text me, tell them that anytime of day, or on the weekend, and if I'm busy, I tell them, "Hey, busy right now, I'll get back to your later." You can schedule a phone call with me on my website, so that we don't have to play phone tag, that pops into my calendar and then we know all right, we're going to talk at 5:00 tomorrow.

 

 

And you can come in and see me. I like being able to schedule an appointments, but we're here, and it's easy to sit down. And I try to spend ... this is a little bit counterintuitive. A lot of lawyers will say I want to spend the least amount of time that I have to with my clients, because I'm, in a sense, wasting money. That the more time that I spend on a case, is the less time that I can spend on other cases and make money.

 

 

I have a goal with my firm, that when I initially meet with a client, I want to spend at least an hour with them. And, later we schedule a time in, so that we can just spend time together. Because, one, I think it helps me understand what's going on with the clients. And two, when someone hires me, they're saying, "Hey, I want you to help me with this problem until we get it resolved." That might take years. And I don't want to spend years with someone, where I don't think we're going to be a good fit.

 

 

So, I guess, to answer your question, I think some people are worried that lawyers are not just like everyone else. And I'm just like everyone else.

 

Neil Howe:

Right, and then you said that some people can be intimidated, maybe they think that their case isn't important enough, or that it's not going to be worth hiring an attorney. Is that something that you see often?

 

Ryan Locke:

Yeah. And I think that that's very true, and that person's case may not be worth having a lawyer. But I would much rather them and talk to me. I tell them all that, and I tell them what to do about it, than they sit at home, and they worry about what they should do, and they don't want to call a lawyer because they're afraid they're going to waste their time, or get laughed at, or whatever. Someone's essentially going to tell them you're stupid for thinking that this is worth my time.

 

Neil Howe:

Right.

 

Ryan Locke:

And-

 

Neil Howe:

But, to get over those fears, if you're sitting down and talking with them for an hour, and really understanding their case, that's definitely going to put their mind at ease, and give them the right direction to go.

 

Ryan Locke:

And I like doing it. One of the reasons I became a lawyer was because I liked helping people. It's on purpose that I represent people who are having problems, and people against powerful interests, and I don't represent companies, or governments, or whatever. I really enjoy sitting down and meeting people and chatting with them. And so, they may worry, "Ryan's this busy, important lawyer, and I'm going to sit down, he's going to talk with me for half an hour about my case, and then I'm not going to hire him, and he's going to be mad, and I wasted his time."

 

 

I enjoy meeting people, and helping them with their problems, even if they don't hire me to take care of it, or I say it's not worth it for you to hire me. But I can still kind of point them in the right direction about how to deal with it.

 

Neil Howe:

So what other perceived obstacles do you see that might prevent people who have been injured from seeking help from a personal injury attorney yourself? Do they think that it's going to cost too much, maybe, or it's going to take too much of their time, so they don't bother?

 

Ryan Locke:

Yeah, I think those are all concerns. Yeah. I think that particularly if you have what we would kind of generally characterize as a smaller case. You may worry, I don't want to ... I'm also worried about, maybe I go to lawyer's office and they kind of pressure me into signing, and then they start working on my case, and it turns out they're getting paid most of the money. We all hear about class action lawsuits where the lawyer's getting paid 10 million dollars, and I get a $5 coupon in the mail. We all hate lawyers like that. And for good reason.

 

 

So I think that's a real fear. And here and a lot of my lawyer friends I know are good like this too, where we're not used car salesmen. We provide this kind of professional service, and if we think we can help, then I'll tell you, "Hey, I think I can help you. I think this is the way that I can add value to your case. If you want to hire me, great, we can do it now, you can go home and think about it. Go home, talk to your family."

 

 

I want ... and I guess it's kind of also talking about being a good fit. It is just as important to me that the client is a good fit, as the case is a good fit. And I've had people come in where I know I'm just not the lawyer for you. Or we're just not going to get along, or whatever. And I think you would probably do better with someone else. Then on the flip side, there have been cases, where I say, "Eh, this isn't exactly the type of case that I would normally take, but I really like you, and I really want to help you." And those, that's where that will kind of swing the needle over to, "Yes, I will take your case."

 

Neil Howe:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). So what kind of mistakes do you see the people make, if they've been injured, and they're looking to get compensation, what mistakes do they make that could really help their case?

 

Ryan Locke:

I think ... not seeking prompt medical care. Not calling the police to accurately document what happened. Or simply waiting too long. Sometimes people might have what could have been a really good case. But for whatever reason, let's say they don't have health insurance, and so they can't really afford to pay for doctors. Maybe the case ... they could have been fairly compensated, but because they never really treated their injuries, now they can't. It's just kind of been too long, and we're probably not going to convince the insurance adjuster. And even when we file suit, we would have a difficult time convincing the jury.

 

 

So I think those are problems. Yeah-

 

Neil Howe:

Definitely, and they're all easily solvable, as just making sure that people are aware to do these things when they get into an accident like that.

 

 

So Ryan, give me an example, please, of somebody that you've helped in your practice, what kind of situation did they come to you with, and how were you able to help them get whole, as you say, or get compensation?

 

Ryan Locke:

Here is ... I'm going to give you a little counterintuitive story, where I help people, I helped this client on the back end. And so, kind of the normal is, you are injured in some way. You come and see me, you get medical treatment, we work your case, and then we deal with the insurance company, and negotiate a settlement, and if we can't negotiate a one then we file suit, and deal with it through litigation.

 

 

Another type of case is someone who is injured, has large medical bills, but no health insurance. And so, I represented a guy, a motorcycle enthusiast, who he was hit by a car while riding his motorcycle, completely not his fault. The other driver had the state minimum level of coverage, $25,000. He also had uninsured motorist coverage, which you're not required to buy in Georgia, but everyone should have. And he had the state minimum, $25,000. So, when he was injured, he was immediately taken to the hospital, because he lost feeling in his foot. And they thought that there was internal bleeding in his leg, and that they might have to amputate the foot. They did tons, and tons, and tons of imaging, x-rays, MRIs, and it turns out that, very luckily for him, is that there was swelling in his foot that compressed a nerve, that made him not be able to feel it, but he was otherwise fine. Miraculously nothing was even broken in his foot. All of that stuff cost about $200,000.

 

Neil Howe:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

 

Ryan Locke:

So, the insurance company for the driver almost immediately sent a check for $25,000. His insurance company almost immediately sent a check for $25,000. And so we have $50,000 sitting in our trust account here, and he owes the hospital $200,000. And you can, for someone who's bad at math like me, even I can see that math's not going to work.

 

Neil Howe:

Right.

 

Ryan Locke:

So, for him, one of the big values that we gave to him was negotiating his medical bills down. And he ... we did surprisingly well with him. Where we negotiated that $200,000 bill down to practically pennies on the dollar. And he also got to take some money. He needed it for additional future treatment that he would need on his leg.

 

Neil Howe:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

 

Ryan Locke:

So that's an area where we can provide value, not on the front end, in getting you more money, but on the back end, is keeping more of that money in your wallet, by negotiating what everyone else gets paid.

 

Neil Howe:

Right. And that's a great outcome.

 

 

Now let's talk a little bit more about you, Ryan, and how you got involved in being an attorney, first, and a personal injury attorney. Describe what drives you and your passion to do what you do, and help the people that you help.

 

Ryan Locke:

Well, let's see, I went to law school at the University of Georgia, here in Georgia. And I think what was really transformative for me were the clinics that I worked in at law school. And then, I worked in a special education clinic, we represented kids who weren't getting the special education services that they needed from local schools. I worked in a domestic violence clinic, we represented victims of domestic violence obtain protective orders against their abusers. And then after I graduated law school, I lived right on the border between Texas and Mexico for a time. And I represented immigrants in asylum and refugee proceedings and stuff like that.

 

 

And I think being able to look someone in the eye, and tell them, "I will be able to help you," is a very powerful feeling. And being able to use my special skills as a lawyer, my training as a lawyer, to make a real difference in someone's life, is powerful. And once I started doing that, I realized, that's pretty much what I want to do. I was a public defender here in Atlanta, that's the lawyer that you get if you can't afford a lawyer. For part of that time, I represented children in the juvenile court, I really enjoyed that, because I was able to really help children who were going down a bad path, kind of turn and really improve their lives and their future. I mean, in conjunction with the district attorney's office, and judges and all that.

 

Neil Howe:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

 

Ryan Locke:

But that was also a very ... I really enjoyed it, because you could see immediate results in helping people. And really life transformative effects from being the right person, in the right place, at the right time.

 

 

And then I kept going by starting my firm. And I started doing the personal injury, representing injured people, when I realized I'd been representing people in the criminal justice area, where people were not getting treated fairly by the criminal justice system. And then in private practice, a lot of people came and talked to me who weren't getting treated fairly in the civil justice system. And I realized, that for a lot of people that's equally as important, and equally as life changing.

 

 

This guy who was on a motorcycle, we were able to get him money for his treatment, and help him avoid a bankruptcy because of these medical bills. And that is a big deal for him. And something that, again, if you're the right person, in the right place, at the right time, you can really help people in that way.

 

Neil Howe:

Ryan, that's-

 

Ryan Locke:

And so that's why I'm a-

 

Neil Howe:

Yeah, it's completely changing somebody's life, then not only did they have the bad fortune to get into an accident on their motorbike, but they ended up with $150,000 deficit that they couldn't pay back. That's probably worse than the actual accident itself.

 

Ryan Locke:

Oh yeah. Oh yeah.

 

Neil Howe:

Well Ryan, thank you very much for being my guest today on Business Authority Radio. Tell us how we can get in touch with you, if there's somebody out there, we've covered a lot of things that they should do when they get into an accident, but one of them is definitely to call an attorney. So how do they get in touch with Ryan Locke at the Locke Law Firm?

 

Ryan Locke:

Hey, they can call me. My website is thelockefirm.com. My phone number ... and anyone who's listening, here's my cellphone. It's 404-909-7785. Call me or text me. And I'll see if I can help you, and if not, I can tell you who can, or I can give you some advice so that you can help yourself.

 

Neil Howe:

Well it's some very great information, very useful to have an attorney in your cellphone-

 

Ryan Locke:

Yeah.

 

Neil Howe:

Just in case, you never know when you're going to need one, and what second you're going to have an accident. So, being prepared and having that information handy is definitely very important.

 

 

Well, I've really enjoyed this interview, Ryan, thank you again for being my guest on Business Authority Radio.

 

Ryan Locke:

Thanks for having me, Neil.

 

Neil Howe:

And to our listening audience, if you like what you hear, hit that like button and share, and we'll see you next time on the show.

 

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